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Author Rankings in the Field of 3D Bioprinting

August 5, 2020

A recent study published in the Journal of Biomedical Semantics performed an analysis and ranking of the most prominent, influential and prolific authors in the rapidly expanding field of 3D bioprinting.  The findings revealed that Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D., of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation, ranked as the second-most prolific author in terms of productivity, citation impact, and collaborative networking. 

 Dr. Ali Khademhosseini awarded IAAM Fellowship

July 28, 2020

 

Dr. Ali Khademhosseini of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) has been awarded a fellowship from the International Association of Advanced Materials (IAAM), for him and his team’s groundbreaking work in precision medicine and the facilitation of its real-world applications in the public health field. He has most notably led the effort in tissue engineering, developing smart devices and materials for diagnostics and therapeutic drug delivery, and perfecting 3D-printed architectures of personalized surgical implants for patients in need. He is distinguished among the brightest and most impactful scientists for his commitment to assure and distribute his knowledge and methods of personalized health to as many people in need as possible.

New Book Applies the Latest Engineering Technologies to Medicine and Biological Research

July 20, 2020

 

From the burgeoning field of biomedical engineering and the ever-present need to provide solutions for medical problems, a new resource has been created that joins engineering technologies with biological research and medicine.  A comprehensive new book entitled “Interfacing Bioelectronics and Biomedical Sensing, and co-edited by Ali Khademhosseini of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Hung Cao of UC Irvine, Todd Coleman of UC San Diego and Tzung Hsiai from UCLA, has been recently published by Springer Nature.   

Cardiac Scar Tissue: A Factor Which Regulates Its Size

July 13, 2020

 

Component of tissue is shown to limit the amount of scarring after heart attack. 

 

(LOS ANGELES) –  When a person has a heart attack, the person’s coronary artery is blocked, cutting off the flow of blood and oxygen to that portion of the person’s heart.  The surrounding heart muscle may be damaged to an extent depending on the size of the blocked area and the time between the attack and treatment. Upon recovery, the heart muscle starts to heal, and like a skin wound, it may form a scar.  The size and location of the scar can vary greatly, and there is a possibility to develop additional complications or even death. 

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